Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky worked in Florence on his opera The Queen of Spades, during the winter of 1890. One day, he thought of a beautiful melody, but didn't want to use it for the Queen of Spades. He noted it down and duly put it away to continue working on the opera. Later, this hastily scribbled down motif gave him the impulse for a string sextet he used to work on, but eventually hit a ditch with and thus put aside, three years earlier. This naïve, romantic tune helped him get that piece back on track: he used it as the main theme of the second, slow movement. This melody itself was the "souvenir de Florence” which became the title of the whole piece. Which is surprising, because nothing else in the whole piece is related to Italy; in fact, the folk motifs and rhythm of movements #3 and 4 are unmistakably Russian. Tchaikovsky completed the first version of the piece by the end of 1890, certain parts of which he then reworked based on feedback from the musicians; and the final version was complete in 1892. The premiere of the string quartet was an enormous success. Today however, it's rather the orchestral version that is usually put on stage. This is also the version the Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra, one of Hungary's best musical ensembles, performed at the Béla Bartók National Concert Hall.
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Programajánló

  • Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau: Der letzte Mann (The Last Laugh) - Hungarian premiere


    Béla Bartók National Concert Hall
  • Contemporary Romantics 2.0


    Béla Bartók National Concert Hall
  • Zugló Philharmonic - King Saint Stephen Symphony Orchestra and Oratorio Choir


    Béla Bartók National Concert Hall
  • Igor Levit and the Vienna Philharmonic


    Béla Bartók National Concert Hall
  • Poulenc: Dialogues des Carmélites


    Festival Theatre